Two-Seat Gliders

Duo Discus
  • Registration: N17HW
  • Owner: Tim Hanke / Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Czech Republic

Duo Discus

It is often used for advanced training. The Duo Discus replaced the Janus as Schempp Hirth's high performance two seater trainer. Although it shares its name with the highly successful Standard Class Discus, any resemblance is only superficial. It first flew in 1993 and is still in production at the factory in Orlican in the Czech Republic. It has a 20 meter four piece wing that is slightly swept forward so that the rear pilot is close to the center of gravity. Its best glide ratio was measured as 45:1

Grob 103 III
  • Registration: N103BP
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Burkhardt Grob
  • Country: Germany

Grob 103 III

It is often used for recreational soaring. The G 103 C Twin III is a development of the Twin II with a new ‘Discus’ plan wing of slightly increased span and modified airfoil section. The cockpit has detailed improvements including better ventilation, relocated airbrake levers to give better purchase, and canopies restrained by gas-filled struts. The unpowered sailplane is cleared for aerobatics similar to the Twin II Acro. Its best glide ratio was measured as 36:1

H36 Dimona
  • Registration: N9125SF
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Hoffmann
  • Country: Austria

H36 Dimona

Original version produced by Hoffmann and later by HOAC, with a 16.0 m (52.5 ft) wingspan, conventional landing gear, 27:1 glide ratio and powered by a Limbach L2000 EB1C engine of 60 kW (80 hp), a Rotax 912A of 60 kW (80 hp) or Limbach L2400 EB of 65 kW (87 hp). Applied for US FAA certificate on 4 April 1982 and received on 9 July 1986 in the utility category at a gross weight of 770 kg (1,698 lb).
DG Flugzeugbau DG-1000s
  • Registration: N56KK
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: DG Flugzeugbau
  • Country: Germany

DG Flugzeugbau DG-1000s

The DG1000 is a glider of the Two Seater Class built by DG Flugzeugbau. It first flew in July 2000 at Speyer in Germany. There are four models, with 18- and 20-metre wings of HQK-51 profile. With an 18 metre span it is fully certified for aerobatics (and +7/-5 Gs); with a 20 metre span it is certified for limited aerobatics (and +5/-2.65 Gs). The retractable engine (DG1000T) is mounted on a pylon aft of the double cockpit. There is a reduction gear (2:3 to 1.0) between the engine and the two-blade carbon-fibre composite propeller. The propeller was designed and is produced by the DG factory.
  • Registration: N18UA
  • Owner: Eric Dobler
  • Manufacturer: Urban Air
  • Country: Czech Republic

Distar UFM-13 Lambada

The Distar UFM-13 Lambada (named for the Brazilian dance) is a Czech shoulder-wing, two-seat motor glider originally designed and produced by Urban Air and now built by Distar Air of Ústí nad Orlicí. The Lambada was designed to comply with the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale microlight rules at a gross weight of 472.5 kg (1,042 lb) and US light-sport aircraft rules at 600 kg (1,323 lb). The design is on the Federal Aviation Administration's list of approved special light-sport aircraft. The aircraft features a cantilever wing, a T-tail, a two-seats-in-side-by-side configuration enclosed cockpit under a bubble canopy, fixed tricycle landing gear or conventional landing gear with a steerable tail wheel and a single engine in tractor configuration.
Grob G 109
  • Registration: N39265
  • Owner: George Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Grob
  • Country: Germany

Grob G 109

The Grob G 109 is a light aircraft developed by Grob Aircraft AG of Mindelheim Mattsies in Germany. It first flew in 1980. It is a two-seat self-launching motor glider in which the pilot and passenger or student sit side by side, with good visibility provided by large windows. As well as normal civilian use this aircraft is now used in Volunteer Gliding Squadrons by the Royal Air Force to train Air Cadets through the Gliding Induction and Gliding Scholarship courses. The Grob 109B is known in RAF service as the Vigilant T1.
Grob G103 Twin Astir
  • Registration: N792TW
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Grob Aircraft
  • Country: Germany

Grob G103 Twin Astir

The Grob G 103 Twin Astir was a two-seat sailplane developed in Germany in the 1970s by Grob Aircraft AGas a counterpart to the single-seat G 102 Astir then in production. Construction throughout was similar, although to preserve the balance of the design, the wings were given a slight forward sweep. While many two-seat derivatives of single-seat sailplanes have fixed undercarriage, due to the added space restrictions created by the second seat, Grob devised a novel retraction system for the Twin Astir. The single wheel was designed to rotate 90° sideways before retracting "flat" under the rear seat, resulting in a rather unusual seating position. This was only incorporated in early examples, later on, the wheel was fixed. Options offered to customers included whether the front seat should be equipped with flight instruments, and whether water ballast capacity should be installed. Production continued until around 1980, when it was replaced in production by the Twin II, a new and not directly related design originally designated G 118 but later redesignated the G 103a.
  • Registration: N313TE
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Pipistrel
  • Country: Slovania

Pipistrel Taurus (Electro)

Developed by Pipistrel as one of the first self-launched glider in the microlight category the design used the wings of the Pipistrel Sinus with a new two-seat side-by-side fuselage. To enable the Taurus to self-launch a pop-out propeller is mounted on the rear fuselage driven by a Rotax 503 piston engine. In 2007 the company developed the Taurus Electro with the piston engine replaced by a permanent magnet synchronous three-phase brushless motor.
  • Registration: N536PV
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Pipistrel

Pipistrel Virus

It is a high-wing, cantilever monoplane of pod-and-boom configuration with a T-tail. The cabin has two seats side-by-side. Its fixed undercarriage can be provided in either tricycle or tailwheel configuration. It is available in three models: the Virus 912 with a 12-metre wingspan, the Virus 912 SW 80 (for "short wing" and 80 hp) and the Virus 912 SW 100, both with a 10-metre wingspan. The Virus SW 100 has an uprated Rotax 912 ULS engine producing 100 hp (75 kW). The SW 100 model cruises at 273 km/h (170 mph), which is 24 km/h (15 mph) faster than the long wing 80 hp (60 kW) version.
Grob 103 II
  • Registration: N1113A
  • Owner: Adirondack Soaring
  • Manufacturer: Burkhardt Grob
  • Country: Germany

Grob 103 II

It is often used for recreational soaring. The cockpit has detailed improvements including better ventilation, relocated airbrake levers to give better purchase, and canopies restrained by gas-filled struts. The unpowered sailplane is cleared for aerobatics similar to the Twin II Acro. Its best glide ratio was measured as 36:1

Grob 103 II
  • Registration: N898AS
  • Owner: Adirondack Soaring
  • Manufacturer: Burkhardt Grob
  • Country: Germany

Grob 103 II

It is often used for recreational soaring. The cockpit has detailed improvements including better ventilation, relocated airbrake levers to give better purchase, and canopies restrained by gas-filled struts. The unpowered sailplane is cleared for aerobatics similar to the Twin II Acro. Its best glide ratio was measured as 36:1

Grob G103 Twin Astir
  • Registration: N2387
  • Owner: Jim Morzillo | Dave Birmback
  • Manufacturer: Grob Aircraft
  • Country: Germany

Grob G103 Twin Astir

The Grob G 103 Twin Astir was a two-seat sailplane developed in Germany in the 1970s by Grob Aircraft AGas a counterpart to the single-seat G 102 Astir then in production. Construction throughout was similar, although to preserve the balance of the design, the wings were given a slight forward sweep. While many two-seat derivatives of single-seat sailplanes have fixed undercarriage, due to the added space restrictions created by the second seat, Grob devised a novel retraction system for the Twin Astir. The single wheel was designed to rotate 90° sideways before retracting "flat" under the rear seat, resulting in a rather unusual seating position. This was only incorporated in early examples, later on, the wheel was fixed. Options offered to customers included whether the front seat should be equipped with flight instruments, and whether water ballast capacity should be installed. Production continued until around 1980, when it was replaced in production by the Twin II, a new and not directly related design originally designated G 118 but later redesignated the G 103a.

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