Single Seat Gliders

Discus 2b
  • Registration: N29PS
  • Owner: Ray Walling
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Discus 2b

The Schempp-Hirth Discus-2 is a Standard Class sailplane produced by Schempp-Hirth since 1998. It replaced the highly successful Schempp-Hirth Discus.

In plan view the almost crescent shape of the leading edge is similar to the Discus but is tapered in three stages. An entirely new wing section is used. The dihedral towards the tips was greatly increased compared with the Discus. Winglets are an optional extra. A version with a narrow fuselage is called the Discus-2a and the wider fuselage version is called the 2b. The fuselage was specifically designed to be highly crash resistant. In U.S. Air Force service the Discus-2b is known as the TG-15B. The Discus-2 has also been successful though the competition from the Rolladen-Schneider LS8 and the Alexander Schleicher ASW 28 has meant that the Discus-2 has not sold in such great numbers as its predecessor, which went unchallenged for many years. 18 metre version A version with an 18 metre span, with the option of smaller wing tips to fly as a Standard Class glider, was launched in 2004 and designated Discus-2c.[1] When fitted with a small sustaining engine (turbo) it is designated Discus-2T.

Discus 2XA
  • Registration: N114TW
  • Owner: Tim Hanke
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Discus 2XA

The Schempp-Hirth Discus-2 is a Standard Class sailplane produced by Schempp-Hirth since 1998. It replaced the highly successful Schempp-Hirth Discus.In plan view the almost crescent shape of the leading edge is similar to the Discus but is tapered in three stages. An entirely new wing section is used. The dihedral towards the tips was greatly increased compared with the Discus. Winglets are an optional extra. A version with a narrow fuselage is called the Discus-2a and the wider fuselage version is called the 2b. The fuselage was specifically designed to be highly crash resistant. In U.S. Air Force service the Discus-2b is known as the TG-15B. The Discus-2 has also been successful though the competition from the Rolladen-Schneider LS8 and the Alexander Schleicher ASW 28 has meant that the Discus-2 has not sold in such great numbers as its predecessor, which went unchallenged for many years. 18 metre version A version with an 18 metre span, with the option of smaller wing tips to fly as a Standard Class glider, was launched in 2004 and designated Discus-2c.[1] When fitted with a small sustaining engine (turbo) it is designated Discus-2T.
Discus A
  • Registration: N33DX
  • Owner: Eric Dobler
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Discus A

The Schempp-Hirth Discus is a Standard Class glider designed by Schempp-Hirth. It was produced in Germany between 1984 and 1995 but has continued in production in the Czech Republic. It replaced the Standard Cirrus. It was designed by Klaus Holighaus.
Discus A
  • Registration: N171JW
  • Owner: Will Jameson
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Discus A

The Schempp-Hirth Discus is a Standard Class glider designed by Schempp-Hirth. It was produced in Germany between 1984 and 1995 but has continued in production in the Czech Republic. It replaced the Standard Cirrus. It was designed by Klaus Holighaus.
FFA Diamant 16.5
  • Registration: N363P
  • Owner: George Wiederkehr | Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Flug- und Fahrzeugwerke Altenrhein
  • Country: Switzerland

FFA Diamant 16.5

The FFA Diamant (English: Diamond) is a family of Swiss high-wing, T-tailed, single-seat, FAI Standard Class and Open class gliders that was designed by engineering students under supervision of Professor Rauscher at the ETH Zurich and manufactured by Flug-und Fahrzeugwerke Altenrhein AG (FFA) of Altenrhein, Switzerland.The Diamant is noted as the first glider that was built entirely from fiberglass, with no other materials, such as balsa, used as a sandwich.
Glaser Dirks DG 101
  • Registration: N54PM
  • Owner: Paul Ditties | Michael Welch
  • Manufacturer: Glaser Dirks
  • Country: Germany

Glaser Dirks DG 101

The DG-100 of 1974 is the first sailplane manufactured by Glaser-Dirks, developed from the Akaflieg Darmstadt D-38, the Standard class sailplane was designed by Wilhelm Dirks. The first model had an all-flying tailplane, with anti-balance tabs along the entire trailing edges, and a two-piece canopy (movable and fixed parts), built of GFRP (glass-reinforced fibreglass plastic)/foam sandwich materials and resin impregnated rovings for high strength parts. Successive developments included the DG-100G, DG-101 and DG-101G. Most models are available with water ballast bags in the wings. The DG-101 and DG-101G had improvements such as a single-piece front-hinged canopy, improved crash resistant cockpit and a conventional tailplane (with fixed horizontal stabilizer and articulated elevator). There was also a club version of this sailplane with fixed landing gear. All models featured top-surface-only air brakes.
Glaser-Dirk DG-100
  • Registration: N17GH
  • Owner: Ian Butler
  • Manufacturer: Glaser-Dirks
  • Country: Germany

Glaser-Dirk DG-100

The first model had an all-flying tailplane, with anti-balance tabs along the entire trailing edges, and a two-piece canopy (movable and fixed parts), built of GFRP (glass-reinforced fibreglass plastic)/foam sandwich materials and resin impregnated rovings for high strength parts. Successive developments included the DG-100G, DG-101 and DG-101G, most models are available with water ballast bags in the wings. The DG-101 and DG-101G had improvements such as a single-piece front-hinged canopy, improved crash resistant cockpit and a conventional tailplane (with fixed horizontal stabilizer and moveable elevator). There was also a club version of this sailplane with fixed landing gear. All models featured top-surface-only air brakes. Some later models were also manufactured by the Elan company in Slovenia and can be identified by the word "ELAN" on the fuselage and rudder. The serial number of these gliders is prefixed with "E".
Glasflügel 303 Mosquito
  • Registration: N11YV
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel 303 Mosquito

Designed for the 15 metre racing class, the Mosquito replaced the Libelle in Glasflügel's production line. It married the Standard Class Hornet fuselage with a new flapped wing employing the ubiquitous FX 67-K-150 airfoil. The wing featured innovative interconnected trailing edge dive brakes-variable camber flaps. The glider had automatic connection for all controls: aileronsbananas, elevator, air brakes and water ballast. The maiden flight of the Mosquito took place in 1976. It is by all accounts a nice handling, comfortable and pleasing aircraft, but a little less performing than the contemporaneous Rolladen-Schneider LS3 and ASW 20. Therefore, the Mosquito (and the Schempp-Hirth Mini-Nimbus that shares the same wing) did not do well in top level competition, neither did it find the large commercial success of the Libelle. The Mosquito was superseded in 1980 by the Glasflügel 304. The 303 Mosquito is often referred to as the H303 or H-303. This is incorrect, as the H designates gliders designed for Glasflügel by the Hütter brothers.
Glasflügel H-101 Salto
  • Registration: N122Z
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel H-101 Salto

The H-101 differs from the Libelle in having a V-tail, showing its ancestry to the V-tailed Hütter H-30 GFK.[1] Four flush-fitting air brakes were fitted to the trailing edges of the wings, replacing the more conventionally-sited air brakes of the Standard Libelle. The Salto's air brakes are hinged at their mid-points so that half the surface projects above the wing and half below. The Salto prototype first flew on 6 March 1970, and 67 had been delivered by early 1977, when production at Start + Flug GmbH Saulgau ceased. Five more Saltos were built from 1993 to 1996 by the German company "LTB Frank & Waldenberger", bringing total output of Salto gliders to 72.
Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle
  • Registration: N8041D
  • Owner: Kurt Lozier
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle

The H-201 Standard Libelle was a follow-on Standard Class sailplane to the successful H-301 Libelle Open Class glider. It was similar to the H-301, with modifications to meet the Standard Class requirements. The prototype made its first flight in October 1967, with a total of 601 being built. The type soon made its mark in contest flying; one flown by Per-Axel Persson of Sweden, winner of the 1948 World Championships, came second in the Standard Class at the 1968 World Championships at Leszno in Poland. The Libelle and Standard Libelle were very popular and influential designs. Their very light wings and extremely easy rigging set a new benchmark. Their handling is generally easy except that they are quite sensitive to sideslipping and have relatively ineffective air brakes that make short landings tricky for inexperienced pilots.
Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle
  • Registration: N252026
  • Owner: Steve Harrison
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle

The H-201 Standard Libelle was a follow-on Standard Class sailplane to the successful H-301 Libelle Open Class glider. It was similar to the H-301, with modifications to meet the Standard Class requirements. The prototype made its first flight in October 1967, with a total of 601 being built. The type soon made its mark in contest flying; one flown by Per-Axel Persson of Sweden, winner of the 1948 World Championships, came second in the Standard Class at the 1968 World Championships at Leszno in Poland. The Libelle and Standard Libelle were very popular and influential designs. Their very light wings and extremely easy rigging set a new benchmark. Their handling is generally easy except that they are quite sensitive to sideslipping and have relatively ineffective air brakes that make short landings tricky for inexperienced pilots.
Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle
  • Registration: N475JS
  • Owner: Jeff Stringer
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel H-201b Standard Libelle

The H-201 Standard Libelle was a follow-on Standard Class sailplane to the successful H-301 Libelle Open Class glider. It was similar to the H-301, with modifications to meet the Standard Class requirements. The prototype made its first flight in October 1967, with a total of 601 being built. The type soon made its mark in contest flying; one flown by Per-Axel Persson of Sweden, winner of the 1948 World Championships, came second in the Standard Class at the 1968 World Championships at Leszno in Poland. The Libelle and Standard Libelle were very popular and influential designs. Their very light wings and extremely easy rigging set a new benchmark. Their handling is generally easy except that they are quite sensitive to sideslipping and have relatively ineffective air brakes that make short landings tricky for inexperienced pilots.
Glasflügel H-301 (Schumannized)
  • Registration: N301JJ / DL
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: Glasflügel* (modified by JJ Sinclair)
  • Country: Germany

Glasflügel H-301 (Schumannized)

In 1964 the H-301 Libelle ("Dragonfly") received the first German and first U.S. Type Certificate issued to an all-fiberglass aircraft. It had flaps, water ballast and retractable landing gear. There are two canopy variants: the normal canopy and a sleeker, lower-profiled 'racing' canopy with no side vent. The canopy is unique in that it has a catch that enables the front to be raised by 25 mm (1 in) in flight to provide a flow of ventilating air instead of the more conventional small sliding panel used for this purpose. The American Will Schuemann pioneered several performance-enhancing modifications to the type, including a re-profiled wing, converting the airfoil to a Wortmann section, various fairings, a new canopy and a reshaped fuselage nose. Aircraft incorporating these changes are informally known as 'Schümanised' Libelles.
Grob G102 Astir CS
  • Registration: N133SS / ADK
  • Owner: Adirondack Soaring Association
  • Manufacturer: Grob Aircraft / Burkhart Grob
  • Country: Germany

Grob G102 Astir CS

The Astir CS [Club Standard] is of composite (fiberglass/resin) construction, has a large wing area, a T-tail and water ballast tanks in its wings. The large wing area gives good low-speed handling characteristics but its high-speed performance is inferior to other Standard-class gliders. In early versions some of the fuselage frame was wood, but this was replaced with a light alloy casting which sometimes cracks after heavy landings. The tail dolly is unusual by being plugged into a vertical hole. A slightly improved standard-class version, the CS 77, was introduced in 1977. It has a different rudder profile and a slimmer fuselage similar to that of the Speed Astir. The Standard II and Standard III versions followed in the early 1980s, reverting to the higher-profile fuselage and with a reduced empty weight and an increased payload. The Astir CS Jeans was similar to the CS 77, but had a fixed mainwheel and a tailskid. Its cockpit was fitted in blue denim. Later versions were the Club II and the Club III which also had fixed gear, but the Club III had a tailwheel. The numbers built of each type were: 536 CS, 244 CS77, 248 CS Jeans, 61 Club/Standard Astir II and 152 Club/Standard Astir III. A flapped version called the G104 Speed Astir was also produced. The latest in the Astir line is the G102 Standard Astir III, designed by Burkhart Grob and built by Grob Aircraft as a development of the original G-102.

One Astir (now residing at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center), flown by Robert Harris, broke the world absolute altitude record at 49,009 ft (14,938 m) on 17 February 1986. This record lasted until 2006.

LAK-12
  • Registration: N412LK
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: LAK Sportine Aviacija
  • Country: Lithuania

LAK-12

The LAK-12 is a Lithuanian mid-wing, single-seat, FAI Open Class glider that was designed and produced by LAK (Litovskaya Aviatsionnaya Konstruktsiya) (English: Lithuanian Aircraft Builders) and later by Sportine Aviacija and Sport Aviation USSR.
Rolladen-Schneider LS-7WL
  • Registration: N78AW
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Rolladen-Schneider
  • Country: Germany

Rolladen-Schneider LS-7WL

The Rolladen-Schneider LS7 is a high-performance Standard Class single-seat sailplane produced by Rolladen-Schneider Flugzeugbau GmbH from 1988 to 1993.

The LS7 was developed as the successor to the LS4, one of the most successful gliders ever produced.

In a departure from the design philosophy of the LS4, Rolladen-Schneider set out to design the LS7 as an uncompromised competition machine, seeking the highest performance possible with the technology of the time.

Designer Wolf Lemke specified a highly laminar wing profile and developed a high aspect ratio wing. Carbon fibre was extensively used in the construction, along with aramid fibre, to ensure enough strength in spite of slender structural elements and increased loadings. The aileron drive bellcranks were entirely concealed within the wings, with a mere 30mm of usable height at the trailing edge.

The LS7 prototype flew for the first time in the Autumn of 1987, and serial production started in 1988. Winglets were introduced in 1991, yielding the LS7-WL. Many earlier LS7s were converted to this standard. Production ended in 1993 with only 164 aircraft having been built.

Rolladen-Schneider LS1-f
  • Registration: N17EW
  • Owner: John Vanderhorn
  • Manufacturer: Rolladen-Schneider
  • Country: Germany

Rolladen-Schneider LS1-f

The LS-1 Standard Class design was the first aircraft type arising from the partnership between Wolf Lemke and Walter Schneider, who had already worked together as students on the ground breaking Akaflieg Darmstadt D-36. Here, and in subsequent Lemke-Schneider (LS) designs, Wolf Lemke concentrated on the aerodynamics while Walter Schneider contributed mostly to the structural and production issues.

The LS1 made its debut at the 1968 German National Championships, taking first and second place with the designers themselves at the controls. The success of this design increased in the subsequent years until, in 1975, it was the most flown glider in the German Nationals. The LS1 took first place in the 1970 World Championships at Marfa, Texas.

The manufacture of the LS1 was discontinued after the IGC introduced the new unrestricted 15 meter Class in the spring 1977, as the manufacturer needed all its resources to increase production of the LS3. A total of 464 LS1 were built. It was succeeded by the LS2 and LS4. LS1-f - introduced the one-piece canopy, conventional tailplane, redesigned rudder and structural changes that allowed more water ballast and higher flight mass. It also has a reduced wing incidence relative to the fuselage, resulting in noticeably better high speed performance than the earlier LS1 variants. (240 built)

Rolladen-Schneider LS8
  • Registration: N833AK
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Rolladen-Schneider, DG Flugzeugbau
  • Country: Germany

Rolladen-Schneider LS8

The Rolladen-Schneider LS8 is a Standard and 18 metre class single-seat glider developed by Rolladen-Schneider and in series production since 1995. Currently it is manufactured by DG Flugzeugbau.LS8-18 a plus mass balanced ailerons and an integral tail tank. Can be operated in 15m and 18m mode (438 built, together with LS8-a)
Schempp-Hirth Standard Cirrus - YZ
  • Registration: YZ
  • Owner: Doug Lawrence
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Schempp-Hirth Standard Cirrus - YZ

The Standard Cirrus was designed by Dipl. Ing. Klaus Holighaus and flew for the first time in March 1969. It is a Standard Class glider with a 15 metre span and no camber-changing flaps. The all-moving tailplane, a feature of many designs of that period due to its theoretically higher efficiency, caused less than desirable high-speed stability characteristics, and so modifications were made to the early design. Even so, the glider is still very sensitive in pitch. By April 1977, when production by Schempp-Hirth ended, a total of 700 Standard Cirruses had been built, including 200 built under licence by Grob between 1972 and July 1975. A French firm, Lanaverre Industrie, had also built 38 Standard Cirruses under licence by 1979. VTC of Yugoslavia also licence-built Standard Cirruses, reaching approximately 100 by 1985. Improvements were made with the Standard Cirrus 75. These included better air-brakes with an increased frontal area.
Schleicher ASW 24
  • Registration: N241JM
  • Owner: Jim Morzillo | Fred Woll
  • Manufacturer: Alexander Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASW 24

The ASW 24 was designed by Schleicher's Gerhard Waibel, with Delft University professor Loek Boermans undertaking the role of aerodynamicist. The prototype made its first flight in 1987, having entered serial production later the same year. It nominally remained in production until 2000, although only a score were built in the mid-to-late 1990s.
Schleicher ASW 24
  • Registration: N271F
  • Owner: Ed Winchester | Santiago Lopez
  • Manufacturer: Alexander Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASW 24

The ASW 24 was designed by Schleicher's Gerhard Waibel, with Delft University professor Loek Boermans undertaking the role of aerodynamicist. The prototype made its first flight in 1987, having entered serial production later the same year. It nominally remained in production until 2000, although only a score were built in the mid-to-late nineties
Schleicher ASW 24
  • Registration: N243J / J
  • Owner: John Urbahn
  • Manufacturer: Alexander Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASW 24

The ASW 24 was designed by Schleicher's Gerhard Waibel, with Delft University professor Loek Boermans undertaking the role of aerodynamicist. The prototype made its first flight in 1987, having entered serial production later the same year. It nominally remained in production until 2000, although only a score were built in the mid-to-late nineties
Schleicher ASW 24E
  • Registration: D-KAYD
  • Owner: Felix Noeling
  • Manufacturer: Alexander Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASW 24E

The ASW 24 was designed by Schleicher's Gerhard Waibel, with Delft University professor Loek Boermans undertaking the role of aerodynamicist. The prototype made its first flight in 1987, having entered serial production later the same year. It nominally remained in production until 2000, although only a score were built in the mid-to-late ninetiesThe ASW 24E is a nominally self-launching variant employing a Rotax 275 engine and a propeller mounted on a retractable pylon. The engine installation is peculiar for its small size and power, more typical of a turbo, and for its manual start with a pilot-operated ripcord.
Schleicher ASW 27B
  • Registration: N45AW
  • Owner: Tony Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASW 27B

The ASW 27 is a 15 metre Class glider built of modern fibre reinforced composites, which first flew in 1995 and was certified in 1997. The manufacturer of the ASW 27 is Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co. The 'W' indicates this is a design of the influential and prolific German designer Gerhard Waibel.The ASW 27 has plain flaps, winglets, a retractable undercarriage and a water ballast system. The structure is a complex composite of carbon, aramid and polyethylene fibre reinforced plastic. This permits a light structure with the strength to carry large amounts of water ballast, thus permitting the widest possible range of wing loadings for weak and strong soaring weather. The strong fuselage was tested for crash protection by dropping one from a crane.
Schleicher Ka 6 CR
  • Owner: Lee Harrison
  • Manufacturer: Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher Ka 6 CR

The Schleicher Ka 6 is a single-seat glider designed by Rudolf Kaiser, built by Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co, Germany and is constructed of Spruce and plywood with fabric covering. The design initially featured a conventional tailplane and elevator which was later replaced by an all-moving tailplane in the -Pe and Ka 6E variants. Variants built before the -CR and -BR used a main skid as the principal undercarriage, with later variants including the Ka 6E using a wheel as the main undercarriage with no nose skid. Other modifications for the Ka 6E include a more aerodynamic fuselage with glassfibre nose and wingroot fairings, longer canopy, and modified aluminium airbrakes.
Schweizer SGS 1-26
  • Registration: N1109
  • Owner: Chris "Stewey" Ryan
  • Manufacturer: Schweizer Aircraft Corporation
  • Country: United States

Schweizer SGS 1-26

The Schweizer SGS 1-26 is a United States One-Design, single-seat, mid-wing glider built by Schweizer Aircraft of Elmira, New York.

The SGS 1-26 enjoyed a very long production run from its first flight in 1954 until 1979, when production was ended. The 1-26 was replaced in production by the Schweizer SGS 1-36 Sprite. The 1-26 is the most numerous sailplane found in the US.

Wiederkehr GHW-1 Cu-Climber
  • Registration: N6419
  • Owner: George Wiederkehr
  • Manufacturer: George H. Wiederkehr
  • Country: United States

Wiederkehr GHW-1 Cu-Climber

The Wiederkehr GHW-1 Cu-Climber is an American, high-wing, single-seat glider that was designed by George H. Wiederkehr and first flown in 1968.The Cu-Climber is an original design and is of mixed construction, with the fuselage of fibreglass with foam bullkheads, forming a semi-monocoque structure. The wings are a fiberglass and balsa sandwich, with fibreglass skin, except aft of the spar on the under-surface where aircraft fabric covering is employed. The wing also features a large 12 inch (30 cm) X 6 inch (15 cm) box spar that is made from spruce, plywood and fiberglass, which is stressed to +9.6/-6.3 g. The wing employs a Pfenninger 14% airfoil. The control surfaces include an all flying tail fitted with an anti-servo tab and full-span ailerons of very short chord that act as flaps when drooped for glidepath control. The landing gear is a fixed monowheel that is faired to reduce drag.The aircraft's designation of GHW-1 indicates the designer's initials. Unusually the aircraft is registered with the Federal Aviation Administration simply as Amateur Built 68 glider. Only one example was ever constructed.
Glaser Dirks DG 300
  • Registration: N302PM
  • Owner: Paul Dittes | Mike Welch
  • Manufacturer: Glaser Dirks
  • Country: Germany

Glaser Dirks DG 300

The DG-300 has a flapless wing with triple taper based on the Falcon designed by Hansjörg Streifeneder, and employs the HQ 21/II, a relatively thick profile (ca. 17.5%). This wing is 'blown' on the underside by 900 small holes to achieve a controlled transition from laminar to turbulent flow without additional drag. However, these holes are prone to clogging due to dirt, moisture and wing surface polishing, which makes them less effective over time. As with any racing glider, the thickness of the wing makes it relatively sensitive to performance degradation due to contamination by insect impacts or rain drops.

It is agile and a good climber, but slightly underperforms compared to its competitors in cruising flight, especially at higher speeds. The later DG-303 version with a new wing profile and winglets was developed that delivers higher performance at low to medium speeds plus increased aileron response. A fully aerobatic version (the Acro) was also sold, stressed for +7/-5g.

The DG-300 has typical DG features, which improve comfort and safety if at a performance cost. It has the large cockpit typical of DG giving excellent comfort, especially in high-altitude flight where the full-length canopy allows the feet to be warmed by sunlight. The view from the cockpit is superb, adding to the pleasure and safety of flight.

After the bankruptcy of Glaser-Dirks the newly founded DG Flugzeugbau GmbH took over the servicing of these gliders.

The operational limits were changed on April 2007 after a defect was detected on the main spar. Aerobatic flight since then is not permitted, even for the Acro versions.

Glaser Dirks DG 300
  • Registration: N300GG
  • Owner: Dan Senecal
  • Manufacturer: Glaser Dirks
  • Country: Germany

Glaser Dirks DG 300

The DG-300 has a flapless wing with triple taper based on the Falcon designed by Hansjörg Streifeneder, and employs the HQ 21/II, a relatively thick profile (ca. 17.5%). This wing is 'blown' on the underside by 900 small holes to achieve a controlled transition from laminar to turbulent flow without additional drag. However, these holes are prone to clogging due to dirt, moisture and wing surface polishing, which makes them less effective over time. As with any racing glider, the thickness of the wing makes it relatively sensitive to performance degradation due to contamination by insect impacts or rain drops.

It is agile and a good climber, but slightly underperforms compared to its competitors in cruising flight, especially at higher speeds. The later DG-303 version with a new wing profile and winglets was developed that delivers higher performance at low to medium speeds plus increased aileron response. A fully aerobatic version (the Acro) was also sold, stressed for +7/-5g.

The DG-300 has typical DG features, which improve comfort and safety if at a performance cost. It has the large cockpit typical of DG giving excellent comfort, especially in high-altitude flight where the full-length canopy allows the feet to be warmed by sunlight. The view from the cockpit is superb, adding to the pleasure and safety of flight.

After the bankruptcy of Glaser-Dirks the newly founded DG Flugzeugbau GmbH took over the servicing of these gliders.

The operational limits were changed on April 2007 after a defect was detected on the main spar. Aerobatic flight since then is not permitted, even for the Acro versions.

Glaser Dirks DG 300
  • Registration: N303BR
  • Owner: RJ Stutzmann | Ben McGill
  • Manufacturer: Glaser Dirks
  • Country: Germany

Glaser Dirks DG 300

The DG-300 has a flapless wing with triple taper based on the Falcon designed by Hansjörg Streifeneder, and employs the HQ 21/II, a relatively thick profile (ca. 17.5%). This wing is 'blown' on the underside by 900 small holes to achieve a controlled transition from laminar to turbulent flow without additional drag. However, these holes are prone to clogging due to dirt, moisture and wing surface polishing, which makes them less effective over time. As with any racing glider, the thickness of the wing makes it relatively sensitive to performance degradation due to contamination by insect impacts or rain drops.

It is agile and a good climber, but slightly underperforms compared to its competitors in cruising flight, especially at higher speeds. The later DG-303 version with a new wing profile and winglets was developed that delivers higher performance at low to medium speeds plus increased aileron response. A fully aerobatic version (the Acro) was also sold, stressed for +7/-5g.

The DG-300 has typical DG features, which improve comfort and safety if at a performance cost. It has the large cockpit typical of DG giving excellent comfort, especially in high-altitude flight where the full-length canopy allows the feet to be warmed by sunlight. The view from the cockpit is superb, adding to the pleasure and safety of flight.

After the bankruptcy of Glaser-Dirks the newly founded DG Flugzeugbau GmbH took over the servicing of these gliders.

The operational limits were changed on April 2007 after a defect was detected on the main spar. Aerobatic flight since then is not permitted, even for the Acro versions.

Discus B
  • Registration: N87BD
  • Owner: Lee Harrison
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Discus B

The Schempp-Hirth Discus is a Standard Class glider designed by Schempp-Hirth. It was produced in Germany between 1984 and 1995 but has continued in production in the Czech Republic. It replaced the Standard Cirrus. It was designed by Klaus Holighaus.
  • Registration: N468E
  • Owner: Rick Hacket | Yeves Nollett
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Schempp-Hirth Standard Cirrus - YR

The Standard Cirrus was designed by Dipl. Ing. Klaus Holighaus and flew for the first time in March 1969. It is a Standard Class glider with a 15 metre span and no camber-changing flaps. The all-moving tailplane, a feature of many designs of that period due to its theoretically higher efficiency, caused less than desirable high-speed stability characteristics, and so modifications were made to the early design. Even so, the glider is still very sensitive in pitch. By April 1977, when production by Schempp-Hirth ended, a total of 700 Standard Cirruses had been built, including 200 built under licence by Grob between 1972 and July 1975. A French firm, Lanaverre Industrie, had also built 38 Standard Cirruses under licence by 1979. VTC of Yugoslavia also licence-built Standard Cirruses, reaching approximately 100 by 1985. Improvements were made with the Standard Cirrus 75. These included better air-brakes with an increased frontal area.
Schempp-Hirth Mini-Nimbus HS7
  • Registration: N19FT
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Schempp-Hirth Mini-Nimbus HS7

In designing the Mini-Nimbus, Klaus Holighaus incorporated the flapped wings from the Glasflügel 303 Mosquito, with the fuselage of the Standard Cirrus.The wings feature trailing edge terminal speed dive brakes-variable camber flaps that limit the vertical dive speed to a maximum of 70 knots when the dive brakes are fully deployed.

The name "Mini Nimbus" was adopted to distinguish it from longer-wingspan Nimbus models. It first flew on 18 September 1976.

The Mini Nimbus range all feature self-connecting controls, of Glasflügel design, for added safety and ease of rigging, and have been incorporated in all newer Schempp-Hirth models. The trim lever is connected to the flap operating rod and needs to be set only once per flight; thereafter changes in flap setting (-7 to +10 degrees) automatically provides trim compensation.

Schempp-Hirth Nimbus-2
  • Registration: N118YV
  • Owner: John Mahoney
  • Manufacturer: Schempp-Hirth
  • Country: Germany

Schempp-Hirth Nimbus-2

Loosely based on the original Nimbus HS-3 prototype, the production version that eventually surfaced as the Nimbus-2 was a very different glider with many improvements over the problematic prototype. The wing was shortened to 20.3 metres and was built in four sections to make it easier to rig and transport. It received Schempp-Hirth air brakes fitted in the upper surfaces and a tail braking-parachute, plus camber-changing flaps. It had an all-flying T-tail similar to the Standard Cirrus as well as the general layout of its fuselage.The Nimbus-2 was successful in competitions, twice winning the Open Class in World Gliding Championships: Göran Ax (Sweden) in 1972 and George Moffat (USA) in 1974. It was also popular with record-seekers. Bruce Lindsey Drake, David Napier Speight and Sholto Hamilton "Dick" Georgeson jointly set a World Goal and Free Distance record of 1,254 km in New Zealand in 1978, Doris Grove a feminine Out and Return record of 1,127 km in 1981, Yvonne Loader a feminine Height Gain record of 10212 m in 1988, and Joan Shaw a feminine Distance record of 951.43 km in 1990, all flying Nimbus-2. At its time several national and world records were held by Nimbus-2M's in the FAI motorglider category. In 1979 Klaus Holighaus, the glider's designer, completed the first 1,000 km triangle in Germany flying a Nimbus-2.

The Nimbus-2 was succeeded by the Schempp-Hirth Nimbus-3.

Hall Cherokee II
  • Registration: N75887
  • Owner: Jeff Stringer
  • Manufacturer: Stan Hall
  • Country: United States

Hall Cherokee II

The Cherokee was designed by Hall to provide homebuilders with an easy-to-construct and inexpensive aircraft that would give performance at least equal to the Schweizer SGS 1-26, which had flown two years earlier.

The Cherokee structure is built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric covering. The fuselage features truss construction, with longerons and gussets and a fixed monowheel landing gear. The wing has two spars, with geodetic braces handling the torsion loads and is built with a fixed center section and removable outer wing panels. The wings have spoilers on the top surfaces and use a Gö 549 airfoil.

As with all plans-built aircraft, builders have made modifications to the design. Some examples have been built with leading edges made from aluminium, cardboard, glass reinforced plastic and plywood and with many different styles of canopy.

DSK Duster BJ-1B
  • Registration: N811NJ
  • Owner: Jeff Stringer
  • Manufacturer: Homebuilt
  • Country: United States

DSK Duster BJ-1B

A conventional shoulder-wing design with conventional empennage, no component of the BJ-1 exceeds 18 ft (5.5 m) in length, in order to facilitate building and storage in a domestic garage. Construction throughout was of wood, apart from a few mouldings (like the nosecone) made of fiberglass. The BJ-1 Dyna Mite first flew in 1966. The rough building sketches from Ben Janssons prototype design from 1963, were refined by Hank Thor and the BJ-1B Duster plans were released in 1971 featuring a lighter weight, extended wingspan and a lower canopy that required the pilot to fly it semi-reclined. By 1977, more than 200 sets of plans had been sold. In total 371 sets of plans were sold and DSK (Duster Sailplane Kits) sold about 169 kits.
DFS Kranich III
  • Registration: N803PW
  • Owner: Jeff Stringer
  • Manufacturer: Karl Schweyer AG
  • Country: Czechoslovakia

DFS Kranich III

Series production of the Kranich (Crane) took place in the aircraft division of Karl Schweyer AG in Mannheim. The two-seater was, in its version 2, the most widely built two-seat glider in Germany from 1935 to 1939. Several hundred examples were built; exact numbers are not known. On 11 October 1940 Erich Klöckner in a Kranich achieved the record height in a glider of 11,460 m. Because it occurred in wartime, the altitude record was not recognized by the Allied occupying powers, and Klöckner only received official recognition by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) in the late 1990s.[1] This record height was only exceeded ten years after the flight by the American Bill Ivans during a similar scientific program in the Sierra Nevada. In 1942 30 Kranichs were built by the Swedish manufacturer AB Flygplan in Norrköping, and delivered to the Swedish Air Force for training purposes. These machines were given the military designation Flygplan Se 103.

Between 1950 and 1952 50 examples of a slightly modified copy of the Kranich II were built in Poland, known as the SZD-C Żuraw (żuraw is Kranich in Polish = "crane").

After the war, Jacobs designed the Kranich III, a new development very different from its predecessors. It was developed and produced at the Focke-Wulf aircraft factory in Bremen. The first flight was on 1 May 1952, piloted by Hanna Reitsch. Thirty-seven were built.

Schleicher ASG 29
  • Registration: N558CA
  • Owner: Peter Scarpelli
  • Manufacturer: Schleicher
  • Country: Germany

Schleicher ASG 29

The Schleicher ASG 29 is a German sailplane in production by Alexander Schleicher GmbH & Co since 2006. It can be flown as an 18 metre Class glider or as a 15 metre Class glider. The 'G' indicates this is a design of designer Michael Greiner. It is a refinement of the popular ASW-27 and for certification purposes it is designated the ASW-27-18.The ASG 29 has plain flaps and winglets. The structure is a complex composite of carbon, aramid and polyethylene fibre reinforced plastic. This permits a light structure with the strength to carry up to 170 liters (322 pounds) of water ballast, thus permitting the widest possible range of wing loadings for weak and strong soaring weather. The unmotorised version made its first flight on 9 November 2005. The 'E' version has a self-sustaining engine (SOLO 2350, 18 hp 2-stroke) and was certified in February 2008. By August 2014 the numbers of ASG29 produced had reached 163 turbos and 87 pure gliders.

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